Profiles

Member Profile | Bimpe Alliu | Art Assistant at ILM

We caught up with Bimpe Alliu, Art Assistant at Industrial Light & Magic and one of the 2017 Achieve Programme alumni to ask her about her career path so far and thoughts on the challenges facing women in our industry.

Personal art project © Bimpe Alliu

Personal art project © Bimpe Alliu

What inspired you to get into VFX?

I’ve always loved feature animation and films (some good and some very questionable), but as comic lover, seeing the growth of the Marvel Cinematic Universe really got me thinking about how I wanted to be part of that development process. It genuinely made me excited to take steps to working as an artist professionally – which was something I hadn’t thought was previously possible, but at least I now know!

Personal art project © Bimpe Alliu

Personal art project © Bimpe Alliu

How did you make it a reality?

After some very kind words from friends, and a bit of faith, trust and pixie dust I decided that I was just going to go for it. At the time I was working in social media for Sony Music UK and started researching university courses as I knew I was lacking both the technical knowledge and skill set. I saved for just over a year before I applied to and was accepted to do MSc Animation and VFX at the University of Dundee, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design (Great course, great uni, great city), and not to be cheesy, but it really was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.

What would you say is the biggest challenge facing women the industry?

Establishing a work life / home life balance. Especially when you’re at the beginning of your career and trying to develop like I am, it can be very easy to fall into the habit of all work all the time. This can leave very little time for anything else which can have a massive knock on effect on everything else in your life.

But also establish a balance within yourself – gaining and retaining confidence and trying to stay as true to yourself as possible.

Personal art project © Bimpe Alliu

Personal art project © Bimpe Alliu

Were there ever times where you felt like being a woman may have impacted your career, or have you ever felt professionally excluded because of it?

Sadly this does still happen and it is something we need to keep working to overcome, but I am definitely grateful as I’ve never felt that my career has been affected as a result. There hasn’t really been anything that I’ve willing allowed to stunt my own progression.

Did you have mentors or support networks throughout your career that really helped push you forward?  Feel free to give a shout out.

I’m still at the beginning of my career in VFX so I’m sure there will be PLENTY of names to come, but as of now I’m definitely grateful for DJCAD and Phillip Vaughan for accepting a VFX newbie onto the course, as well as my ridiculously talented and supportive course-mates (Especially Natasha Dudley, who I’m still learning from even now). Also my friends who helped give me the extra confidence to take this leap and ‘start again’ (Esther Roberts and Abigail Balfe!). But also my current colleagues – the ILM Art Department here in London, who are always willing to look, listen and teach me new things – but also have a great supply of biscuits and green tea.

Personal art project © Bimpe Alliu

Personal art project © Bimpe Alliu

How do you plan to help advance the idea of more women in the industry?

As someone at the beginning of their career I want to show the same support that has been given to me.

What advice would you give to women wanting to enter the industry?

Trust yourself and take that step. Be excited about your growth and development and all the opportunities that will come.

Bimpe Alliu

Bimpe Alliu

You took part in AWUK’s Achieve Programme.  How do you feel it benefited you?

Ah I loved this programme. The opportunity to share experiences with and gain advice from other women in the industry has been invaluable, and has definitely impacted the way I view and approach certain scenarios. It also gave me the confidence boost to start discussing my own career development.

But probably most importantly for me it helped me begin to really understand and value the importance of balance and mental wellbeing when working in any industry – knowing when it time to leave work behind for the day and really look after yourself.

Definitely worth applying for.

If you were hosting a dinner party who would you invite and why?

It would have to be a dinner date with Maya Angelou – to thank her for everything I’ve learnt in the last couple of years about personal growth and perseverance.

Posted by Claire Hogg in Profiles, 0 comments

AWUK Curate Special 3DArtist Gallery

At AWUK, we delight in collaborating with exciting organisations that showcase women’s work and make their voices heard. We are ecstatic to have been approached by 3DArtist Editor Carrie Mok to curate a special edition gallery in their January issue that celebrates the work of some very talented women.

It was a tough task selecting 10 pieces from all the fantastic work that was submitted, but it was also a lot of fun .We chose work that not only showed strength and variety, but also the unique stamp of each artist. We really enjoyed reading about the process and techniques used as well as the initial inspiration for each piece.

The January edition is now on the shelves, but we’ve been given special permission to share a .pdf version of the gallery with you.

Enjoy!

Posted by Lucy Cooper in Profiles, 0 comments

Animating Women

Early this year, we had the great opportunity to collaborate with The University of Arts in Philadelphia (https://uarts.edu).  John Sepentelli, lecturer at UArts, was interested in creating a brief for his students to animate the AWUK logo. We loved the idea, and were interested to see how the students would portray AWUK values through their animations.

After a few months, we received some lovely animations and caught up with the creators of our favourites to ask them how they’d come up with and realised their ideas.

Lana Gearce

What drew you to study animation?

My whole life I only ever drew as realistically as I could with pencil and coloured pencil. It wasn’t until mid-high school that I realized my interest in animation. Looking back, I can see that it was always something I wanted, I just hadn’t figured it out yet. I have always had a strong love of cartoons and animated films, and now I want to be a part of them or make my own! I have also always loved writing and that goes hand in hand with animation.

Could you tell us about how you tackled the brief and the process for creating your piece?

For my piece I really wanted to do something that was fun, flowy, and full of transformations. I also love camera movement in animation and wanted to explore that.

What is the message you aimed to convey with your animation?

I am all about inclusiveness and diversity. I really aim to include all sorts of body types, race, gender, sexualities, and disabilities wherever and whenever I can in my work. With this piece I tried to make each woman that appears look different in race and body type.

And finally, what would you like to go on to do after your studies?

After graduating I would love to work on a 2D animated show, maybe as a storyboarder. It’s my dream to work on a show for Cartoon Network, but I’m going to make my own work for a little while (I am thinking of starting a webcomic) to improve my skills, while hopefully working for an animation company or interning somewhere.

Robert Bahn

What drew you to study animation?

I have been drawing ever since I could hold a crayon and always had the intention of being a professional artist, but I’m a recent convert to animation as a profession. Like a lot of kids in the late 90’s to early 2000s, I grew up on a vast diet of animation –  far too many to properly list. To that end, I always had the ambition of becoming an animator right up until my senior year of high school when I conceded that, while I was a decent if inexperienced artist, I didn’t have what it took to be an animator. Little did I know that community college would put me down that path again when I saw a poster for an animation class. Surprisingly, I enjoyed it quite a bit! Not just the result, but the process. So my progress as an artist became inexorably tied to my progress as an animator, which lead me to UArts and my continued pursuit of animation as a career.

Could you tell us about how you tackled the brief and the process for creating your piece?

During the initial storyboard process I initially thought about making it like a Road Runner cartoon, where the cartoon character just met a very comical fate in a hole in the ground of a vast canyon by an unseen force. My supervisor convinced me to make it more hopeful and tied to AWUK’s message of gender equality, which is where the superheroine came from.

The whole process took about three months from conception to completion. I wanted to make the complex camera movements that I was attempting to be clear and concise from the get go, carefully planning the movements in the animatic before using it as the basis of the finished film. Rough animation was a two part process, animating the characters and the background on separate layers. Cleanup and color were the last aspects of of the film to be completed, being finally finished around the beginning of August.

What is the message you aimed to convey with your animation?

It’s honestly pretty literal. The cartoon character, who is characteristically classical in design, gets saved by the AWUK superheroine, who represents the future of animation and women’s role in that future. Women are the future of animation.

And finally, what would you like to go on to do after your studies

Eventually I want to get work as both an animator and a storyboard artist. I definitely have strengths as both an animator and a storyteller and they balance each other out.

Anaiyah Luther

What drew you to study animation?

I’ve always loved animation and I’ve been drawing since I could hold a crayon. I spent pretty much every day growing up glued to the TV watching cartoons. I remember one day someone on Nickelodeon explaining how animation works by giving a demonstration of “the bouncing ball” and then encouraging us kids at home to try it out ourselves on post it notes. After that I did a series of little stick figure animations on post-its for my friends and I remember how cool it felt to be able to make them laugh with my drawings. Once I took my first animation class before college I was hooked. I realized that even though animating was really hard and time consuming I actually loved every minute of it and I was really excited about being able to bring all the characters and ideas in my head to life.

Could you tell us about how you tackled the brief and the process for creating your piece?

After we found out what we were doing for this project I did a thumbnail of my idea right away and then went straight into TV Paint to get the major poses down. From there on it was all in-betweening and coloring.

What is the message you aimed to convey with your animation?

I mostly just wanted to show a woman in her creative process. Animation is hard and coming up with ideas can be frustrating. I like showing that because I think it’s great that despite that, we keep going and we keep making art.

And finally, what would you like to go on to do after your studies

It would be great if I could have my own animated series one day that had some kind of lasting impact on people.  I really love to make people laugh but I also love cartoons that have multifaceted characters and shows that discuss important topics to kids. At the same time I also really enjoy animations that are aimed at adults so I think I’ll be happy as long as I can work on animation that I can be proud of.

Angel Kawash

What drew you to study animation?

As a kid, I use to love watching Disney movies with strong women. I believe what drew me in most was when I was watching Mulan and they showed the extra scenes where they would show us the rough animations. As soon as I saw that, it was a bit of a spark for me. I wanted to be a part of creating strong, smart, powerful women and I just remember thinking, “I CAN MAKE MY DRAWINGS MOVE?!” As I got older, I realized that I wanted to make a difference with my animations, I hope I can initiate a spark in someone else or make someone smile at the very least. I’ve had struggles throughout my life between identity, mental anguish, staying positive, and so on and so forth. I hope to create my animations in a way that I can let people know they aren’t alone in their struggles and that it does get better. Animation is powerful and I enjoy being part of this community.

Could you tell us about how you tackled the brief and the process for creating your piece?

At my current status, I am trying to learn as much as I can when it comes to physically animating as well as learning how to create a coherent story or message in my pieces. I had to do a lot of research on how the body moves when one belly dances, and mostly I had to get up and belly dance myself which was pretty funny. I enjoyed the process of learning body movement. I believe that animation is so fulfilling because there are times where once you get the hang of it the animation flows through your pencil almost by instinct. We are celebrating women of animation and I enjoyed every part of it.

What is the message you aimed to convey with your animation?

I am an Arabian and Italian woman. Growing up was a bit tough, especially during 9/11. I just remember being in kindergarten and not being allowed to say my last name – everyone just called me Angel K. When I heard about this opportunity to make an animation celebrating women, I really wanted to tackle incorporating some of my culture so I decided on belly dancing. Being sheltered and almost scared of my culture growing up, I did not learn much, but I always held onto the time my aunts taught me how to belly dance. It was our way of celebrating our culture and us as women – I had a lot of fun during those times.

And finally, what would you like to go on to do after your studies

After my studies, my goal is to be able to work in an animation studio and be apart of the character designs and hopefully story telling/storyboarding or even the animating itself. I know it will be a lot of work, but I hope to create animations that speak to people emotionally, mentally and spiritually.  Again, thank you for this opportunity.

AWUK would like to take this opportunity to thank all the students that participated and UArts for reaching to us and supporting the work we do!

Posted by Claire Hogg in Profiles, 0 comments

Member Profile | Kim Noce | Freelance Filmmaker & Artist

What inspired you to get into animation?

I originally came from a background in fine art studying for a BA and MA.  When I came to  London I started working in the film industry, but I felt live action lacked the tactile element the Arts can bring so I decide to do an MA at the NFTS. The Brother Quay, Svankmajer and Susan Pitt were all strong influences in drawing me towards animation as an art form.

How did you make it a reality?

Hard work, luck and most importantly persistence.

What would you say is the biggest challenge facing women the industry?

Belief in themselves, but that can apply across the board. Of course you encounter obstacles, but the key is to believe in yourself and to build slowly and carefully. It does not come by itself.

Were there ever times where you felt like being a woman may have impacted your career, or have you ever felt professionally excluded because of it?

There are ceilings to be broken and the statistics speak for themselves, but I was either oblivious to it or just lucky as I have never felt there was anything I couldn’t overcome – even if it meant changing gears.

Did you have mentors or support networks throughout your career that really helped push you forward?  

The whole animation community, teachers, filmmakers, festival goers and people you trust! Too many to name! Everyone you meet feeds you step by step.

How do you plan to help advance the idea of more women in the industry?

By supporting each other.

What advice would you give to women wanting to enter the industry?

Make a plan of what you want to achieve and the steps you think you should take, and adjust accordingly to what life throws you.

If you were hosting a dinner party who would you invite and why?

I probably simply would not host a dinner party!  I hate being the center of attention and I prefer one to one communication. I love chance encounters.

Take a look at some of Kim’s amazing work.

Watch nest of stone

Watch Love-in-Idleness

Watch The Evening Her Mind Jumped Out of Her Head

 

 

Watch Deep Beneath the Earth

Posted by Claire Hogg in Profiles, 0 comments

Member Profile | Isobel Stenhouse | Production Supervisor at Double Negative

One of our key goals at AWUK is to showcase the great work of our members.  This is the first in a regular series where we’ll get to know our members a bit better as well as take a look at some of their work.  

What's your name and where do you work?

Isobel Stenhouse, I'm a Production Supervisor in the Feature Animation department at Double Negative. 

What inspired you to get into animation?

I watched an endless number of cartoons in the 80's, such as Superted and Thundercats, but it was a trip to Disneyworld that really captured my imagination. I wanted to be an 'imagineer', or theme park designer. I thought animation may be a route to that, but as soon as I started my degree course, I was more than happy to stick to film. Drawing has been my lifelong passion, and although I don't feel I've ever quite reached the standard I've wanted to artistically, I'm still so grateful for where I am today.

 

We're Going on a Bear Hunt

Isobel Line Produced 'We're Going on a Bear Hunt' at Lupus Films.  Images © Bear Hunt Films Limited MMXVI

How did you make it a reality?

After taking what seemed like a sensible route into design engineering, I realised that this wasn't my world and I wasn't being me. Incredibly, my company paid for evening classes, so on taking A Level Art, I decided...I am doing this! I got a deferred entry onto the BA Animation course at the Arts University Bournemouth, saved for a year and a half, and the rest is history!

What would you say is the biggest challenge facing women the industry?

Knowing what to do if faced with working conditions that take over your life, which can too often be the case. I know many women who have had varied careers because they recognise that life has many facets, and if they can't spend time with their family, or write in the evenings, or play a sport, or whatever it is that they enjoy doing or must do outside of their day job, it leaves them facing tough decisions.

We're Going on a Bear Hunt

© Bear Hunt Films Limited MMXVI

Do you think that being a woman has impacted your career, or have you ever felt professionally excluded because of gender?

I have seen a boys' club or two in action, but they haven't impacted my career, and I've usually progressed when I've wanted to. I have been in situations where I felt my opinion was perceived as less valuable or I've been seen as too bold, but that's been more exasperating than career-stopping! On the plus-side, I feel that I have a certain nurturing aspect to my character that may have led to some of my leadership roles. Is that because I'm a woman? I have no idea!

Did you have mentors or support networks that helped push you forward in your career?  Feel free to give a shout out.

Mentors, no. However, I cannot think of a more supportive industry than animation when it comes to colleagues. From Emma Burch and Simon Tofield helping me move into new roles such as Art Director on Simon's Cat, to Peter Dodd, Roger Mainwood and the Lupus Films' ladies for bringing me onto Ethel and Ernest, and to Denise Dean for being a constant animation ally, I feel very fortunate. The Ethel and Ernest trainees gave me a huge injection of enthusiasm. And more friends and colleagues helped me along the way. How much space do I have? People are so important, and I love paying it forward too!

Ethel and Ernest

Isobel was Animation Supervisor on Ethel and Ernest at Lupus Film.  Images © Ethel & Ernest Production Limited, Melusine Productions S.A., The British Film Institute and Ffilm Cymru Wales CBC 2016

How do you plan to help advance the idea of more women in the industry?

I don't think I have to. Animation courses are packed with women. What we need to work on is how to retain women in the industry, and how to ensure they are supported in fulfilling their potential. Knocking the culture of long working hours on the head, more flexibility, and mentoring schemes would be good starting points. I've recently been championing better working conditions and am mentoring a student at Saint Martin’s, although I see no reason for this to be gender specific. I think everyone entering the industry deserves support.

What advice would you give to women wanting to enter the industry?

Know that you have the power to incite change and influence others. Every small improvement matters and can lead to the next. So if you want to follow your passion, but have barriers in your way, look for the people that will help you knock them down and trample them into the ground!

Ethel and Ernest

© Ethel & Ernest Production Limited, Melusine Productions S.A., The British Film Institute and Ffilm Cymru Wales CBC 2016

You took part in AWUK’s Achieve Programme.  How do you feel it benefited you?

The course allowed me to reflect on aspects of my work that I hadn't really considered, such as value to the company and assertiveness. It actually gave me the confidence to ask for a small raise, and although that didn't go down very well, I got it! The opportunity to talk about difficult work situations with like-minded women was quite therapeutic and helped me view situations from a different perspective. Most importantly, it gave me the platform to talk about the subject of mental health, and how our industry can impact it. This is now something that I hope to discuss more widely.

If you were hosting a dinner party who would you invite and why?

A chef! I'm a terrible cook! And the crew of the Illusionist, for old times' sake. It was a production full of all sorts of craziness, but the bond we had as a team was second to none.

If you’re interested in being profiled, please email lucy@animatedwomenuk.com

Posted by Peri Friend in Profiles, 1 comment